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Photography Tips for Better Photography

3 Ways Depth of Field Can Help You Get Great Bokeh

Looking for tips to get beautiful Bokeh in your photography? Check out this tutorial on three ways depth of field can help you achieve beautiful bokeh

Let’s Talk about Depth of Field.

In case you are not following along, we are on week 12 of the Everyday Eyecandy  Project 52!  I haven’t given you a photography related lesson in a while, but I found myself talking about Bokeh on yesterday’s Facebook Live and it occurred to me that I hadn’t actually sat down and written a photography related post in a while.  While the theme this week is Bokeh, bokeh is dependent on depth of field. And using Bokeh and depth of field together ( a shallow depth of field and the bokeh effect) can produce wonderful and creative results.

 

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depth of field

Taken with Canon 6D and Canon 100mm 2.8 lens

Settings f/10 Shutter Speed 1/100 ISO 6400

 

Simply put, Depth of field is the area of your photo that is in focus.  A large depth of field means there is a LOT of your photo in focus.  A small depth of field means there is a SMALL amount of your photo in focus.

 

There are 3 ways Depth of Field can help you get great Bokeh

  • Aperture( the f/stop)
  • The distance between you and the area you are focused on
  • Focal length ( the lens you are using)

 

Aperture

Remember, aperture determines how much light comes through your lens to your camera and can determine how much of your photo is in focus because…

SMALL f-stop numbers ( say f/1.2) crates a small or shallow depth of field.
 depth of field vs bokeh

Take with Canon 6D and Canon 100mm 2.8 lens

Settings aperture f/2.8 Shutter Speed 1/500 ISO 3200

 

LARGE f-stop numbers ( say f/20) create a large or deep depth of field.

 depth of fieldTaken with Canon 6D and Canon 24-105 4.0 L lens

Settings: Aperture f/10 Shutter Speed 1/800 ISO 400

 

The distance between you and the area you are focusing on

The distance between your camera and your subject plays a HUGE role.

  • The closer that you and your camera are to the subject that you are focusing on, the smaller or more shallow your depth of field is.
  • The farther you and your camera are to the subject that you are focusing on, the larger or less shallow your depth of field is.

 

Focal length

Your focal length of your lens also plays it’s part.

  • The LONGER your focal length of your lens, the smaller/more shallow your depth of field.
  • The SHORTER the focal length of your lens, the larger or deeper your depth of field.

depth of field vs focal length

All of the photos above were taken standing in the same place, in the same light with the same settings. The only thing different  were the focal lengths.  Notice how much of the photo is in focus changes with each change in focal length.

 

 bokeh vs depth of field

 

Taken with Canon 100 mm 2.8 lens

Settings: Aperture: f/10 Shutter Speed 1/100 ISO 6400

Play with your aperture today. See how distance , f stop and focal length affects your photos.  Questions?  Sound off in the comments! 

You can still join up with the Everyday Eyecandy Project 52. Just join our Facebook group and start shooting!

 

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